How Much Does Music PR Cost?

Music PR Clash Headphones

“Well… What’s your budget?”

The question which should make you run a mile from any music PR companies who are asking you this question.

This is the first sign of a company attempting to extract as much money as possible from you in order to provide you exactly the same service and results regardless of the budget you give them.

With Music PR, the results are determined by the quality of the music, the artist’s history and previous press and their angles. A PR company isn’t able to create bespoke packages where the more you pay the greater the results because a PR company has already done the hard work, they’ve gained relevant press contacts who are willing to consider music when they send it, so it doesn’t take more work to send a few more emails to the most sough-after people.

A Music PR company should already know the price a campaign is worth, and if the music is right for them, they will know the estimated results. Most music PR companies will work on either a 4 week – 8 week timeline, where they will be pitching your song and press release to influential journalists both before the release of your track and after.

The price of music PR varies, from £700 – £1,000 per month. The price is dependent on the reputation and experience of the music PR firm, so if you’re looking for a company who are able to secure high level press then you’ll be looking to hire a publicist at the top end of that price range.

Most companies in the UK will allow you to pay in instalments, usually one payment before your campaign has commenced and a second payment half way through your campaign.

What a PR campaign involves?

1) Writing the press release

To ensure that both the artist and PR company agree on the direction of the campaign, the publicist will write a press release for your approval. You have the opportunity to make amendments, and once you are happy you make your first payment

2) Pre-release and premieres

Using a private SoundCloud link and your press release, the publicist will send out to blogs, and if you’re looking for a music blog to premiere your music the publicist will find the best possible blog to premiere your track.

3) Post-release

By this point, your release will have momentum and you’ll make your second-payment.

The publicist will reach out to more blogs using the traction from the publications who covered the track pre-release. The coverage you receive can also lead to being added to Spotify and Apple music playlists.

Summary

Don’t try to go cheap with Music PR, as it’s a speculative investment and can be a stressful process, so ensure you’re in safe hands by hiring companies who are providing consistent results.

If you’re wondering who is best to hire and how to filter out the crap, you can read our blog post on the questions you should ask music promotion companies before hiring them:

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